Session 9: Living in a Sausage City: The Fresher it Gets, the More People Eat It? The More People Eat It, the Fresher it Gets?

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Tuesday, July 19, 2016 7pm-9pm, CRAB Park, Vancouver

This session will be led by Mariane Bourcheix-Laporte.

As we continue to explore the research and practices of participating members of The School for Eventual Vacancy, this session will discuss what it means to live as settlers in Vancouver, a city that has integrated the Hygrade sausage motto at the heart of its development strategy: “Plus de gens en mangent parce qu’elles sont plus fraîches. Elles sont plus fraîches parce que plus de gens en mangent (They are fresher because more people eat them. The more people eat them, the fresher they get).”

In a city in which vertical expansion has seemingly no bounds, stretching budgets at the same time as skylines, what meaning does the phrase “we acknowledge that we are on Coast Salish territory” actually hold? What does the right to the city mean in a place where occupying the city is at once a byproduct and an extension of ongoing colonization processes? Does participation in the life of the city necessarily reinforce these processes or can it intervene in them?

Readings:

1. How High is the City? How Deep is our Love? by Jeff Derksen

2. Unfinished thoughts on settlement, occupation, and colonization by Mariane Bourcheix-Laporte

As we’ll be meeting outdoors, please dress appropriately, bring blankets and any sustenance you need. It gets colder than you think as the sun starts to go down. There is ample bike parking, washrooms on site, and a nearby car lot. There are transit stops nearby, and the park is a short walk from Main and Alexander. CRAB park is located here.

Session 8: Experiments in Civic Media (Prototyping Creative Publics Lab)

Piece of Work, acrylic on paper, 15.5×21 cm, 2015 by Liu Yao-Chung, via: http://extremely-normal-studio.tumblr.com/post/132526576125
Piece of Work, acrylic on paper, 15.5×21 cm, 2015
by Liu Yao-Chung, via: http://extremely-normal-studio.tumblr.com/post/132526576125

Tuesday, July 12, 2016 7pm-9pm, CRAB Park, Vancouver

This session will be led by Tara Mahoney, Co-Founder and Creative Director of Gen Why Media, PhD Candidate at SFU School of Communication, and Project Lead of the Creative Publics Field Study.

As we begin to shift to exploring the research and practices of participating members of The School for Eventual Vacancy, this session will interrogate what it means to “participate” in contemporary capitalist societies and what forms of participation evoke personal and collective agency. Tara will lead an exploration of the ideas and practices behind Creative Publics Lab.

Creative Publics Lab brings together post-secondary students with community organizations to co-design civic media projects that experiment with new forms of political participation. Housed at the SFU School of Communications, the lab imagines a space where participants understand themselves as political agents who use media, art, design and community organizing to draw connections between their own stories and those of the broader community while achieving clear goals around specific issues.

Together, we will ask, how can post-secondary institutions become production centres of applied political praxis?

Readings:
1. Case study of WochenKlausur
2. Media Literacy as a Core Competency for Engaged Citizenship in Participatory Democracy

As we’ll be meeting outdoors, please dress appropriately, bring blankets and any sustenance you need. It gets colder than you think as the sun starts to go down. There is ample bike parking, washrooms on site, and a nearby car lot. There are transit stops nearby, and the park is a short walk from Main and Alexander. CRAB park is located here.

Session 7 (Part III): Representing Conflict, Imaging and Imagining the Worst

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Session 7 (Part III): Conflict in Public + Conflict as Justice

Representing Conflict, Imaging and Imagining the Worst

July 5, 2016, 7pm – 9pm, 221 E Georgia, Vancouver

Hosted by Stephan Wright.

Tuesday, July 5 will be the third and final session on the theme of Conflict.

As a sort of coda to our ongoing discussion of conflict, we will select and screen a series of excerpts and short films to lay the foundation for a summarizing, and yet certainly incomplete, conversation and agonistic exchange.

We’ll look to explore the ways in which conflict has been represented, co-opted, compromised, mediated, and extinguished. What can we learn from how we’ve ‘seen’ and witnessed conflict, and how might that prepare us to renegotiate our own relationship to conflict, disagreement, and dissensus? If conflict at once hosts both the possibility for building the foundation of democratic political action, and the possibility for indiscriminate violent expression, how can we best deploy an understanding and practice of conflict that can build out agency, autonomy, and action?

All are welcome. You do not need to have attended previous session to attend this one.

Session 7 (Part II): Getting on Like a House on Fire: Private Practice, Public Problems

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Session 7 (Part II): Conflict in Public + Conflict as Justice
Getting on Like a House on Fire: Private Practice, Public Problems

June 28, 2016, 7pm – 9pm, CRAB Park, Vancouver

Led by Caitlin Chaisson.

This session will build on some of the ideas that concluded last week’s session, where the conversation began to explore the role of the personal, the intimate, and the private in issues of conflict. This session will attempt to think through the relationship between the family and the city, and what it means when personal disagreements spill into the social realm. How do the ways we practice conflict in private inform public problems? What thin line separates the kindred from the alien? What potential lies in arguments that are endlessly rehashed? All are welcome to attend, regardless of whether you were able to make it to the previous session or not.

Like all sessions, readings are available below, but you don’t need to read them beforehand to attend.

Reading 1 + Reading 2

As we’ll be meeting outdoors, please dress appropriately, bring blankets and any sustenance you need. It gets colder than you think as the sun starts to go down. There is ample bike parking, washrooms on site, and a nearby car lot. There are transit stops nearby, and the park is a short walk from Main and Alexander. CRAB park is located here.

Session 7: Conflict in Public + Conflict as Justice

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Our expectations of being in public, as a public, are built around some challenging ideas of duration, temporality, and capacity. Where one public finds a platform for agency, another finds a front of domination and erasure. This may be irresolvable, and so, how can we think critically and productively together about the forms, practices, and logics of justice that we encounter, support, and enforce?

This session will sprawl across a number of weeks beginning on June 21st. Each Tuesday from 7pm–9pm, we’ll meet in public, work through a short text, and add to a growing list of demands that we’ll make of ourselves and the structures that enclose us.

Texts will be posted on this page the Friday before each meeting (but you don’t need to read it to attend). This session will be co-led by Danielle Sabelli:

Reading 1 + Reading 2 (pdfs)

As we’ll be meeting outdoors, please dress appropriately, bring blankets and any sustenance you need. There is ample bike parking, washrooms on site, and a nearby car lot. There are transit stops nearby, and the park is a short walk from Main and Alexander. CRAB park is located here.

Session 6: Hidden Curriculum and Distance Education

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This session will aim to reveal hidden curricula in educational infrastructures and everyday practice. Distancing education from traditional pedagogical dogmas to think of learning in an expansive scope, we will take up distance education as something more than a response to scarcity or an inclination towards independent management.

Through an engagement with various concepts of distance, we will locate ourselves in a vantage that illuminates what it is we are learning, when we are learning. Guided by an effort to not only unpack, but to deploy hidden or secret knowledge and curriculum within and against educational models, this session will explore the potential of forms, gestures and articulations that take place across great distances and expanses of time.

Hidden Curriculum and Distance Education will lead to the preparation of a package of materials, resources, and ephemera, culminating in a correspondence project that will be posted to a traditional postsecondary institution. Throughout this session, the School will work to confront the impending potential of full automation, the end of work, and a continual flexing of “the future”, while preparing a lens through which to read the hidden, underrepresented and overrepresented positions in education capital.

Curriculum is led by the research interests of the instructors for each session’s students, with an underlying concern for the necessary maintenance of The School towards its eventual vacancy. Instructors are provided the opportunity to lead the group in any lesson, exercise, production, research, or exploratory activity they see fit as it relates to their own research or the larger interests of The School.

This session will be led by Caitlin Chaisson and Justin Langlois and will run on Friday, February 5, 2016 from 12pm to 3pm, 1535 West 3rd Avenue, Vancouver.

Enroll in this session here. Everyone is welcome.

Session 5: Endless Production: Not-Making and Potentiality

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This session explores inclinations to stop making, to think about the things not made or never-to-be made, and to explore anti-making as a coherent strategy to critical art and design practices. Together, we will work to develop complications, potentialities, and lines of flight that can aid us in examining material and social practices as sites of eventual non-production.

Curriculum is led by the research interests of the instructors for each session’s students, with an underlying concern for the necessary maintenance of The School towards its eventual vacancy. Instructors are provided the opportunity to lead the group in any lesson, exercise, production, research, or exploratory activity they see fit as it relates to their own research or the larger interests of The School.

The School’s sessions operate under the following schedule, with courses offered on a rotating schedule by different instructors across each Block over the course of the month:

Thursday, November 19
Block A (Thematic Introduction): 7pm – 7:20pm
Block B (Not-Making – Justin Langlois): 7:20pm – 8:00pm
Block C (Potentiality – Caitlin Chaisson): 8:00pm – 9:30pm

Please note that enrolees need not be available for every scheduled class to attend all or part of the session. The location of this session will be announced shortly.

Enroll in this session here. Everyone is welcome.

Session 4: School as Art, as Prison, as Industry

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School as Art, as Prison, as Industry will explore a variety of models for curricular delivery as experienced and imagined by students, administrators, teachers, and community members. This session will posit that the notion of school, as a constructed and shared system of values and practices, is often shaped and reshaped under rubrics of other known organizational systems of power and exploitation. Together, we will model efficiencies to achieve any one of these outcomes and compare them to our present situation(s), aiming to cultivate capacities to resist and rebuild together.

In addition to participating in each Instructor’s session, students will negotiate collectively how to spend the time in their own session and can expect the full participation of the Instructors. Each session will culminate in a publication that may include, but will not be limited to, a pamphlet, exhibition, book, documentary, walk, meal, demonstration, or event, designed to offer a sense of summary or closure to the activity.

Curriculum is led by the research interests of the instructors for each session’s students, with an underlying concern for the necessary maintenance of The School towards its eventual vacancy. Instructors are provided the opportunity to lead the group in any lesson, exercise, production, research, or exploratory activity they see fit as it relates to their own research or the larger interests of The School.

The School’s sessions operate under the following schedule, with courses offered on a rotating schedule by different instructors across each Block over the course of the month:

Friday, October 9, 2015
Block A (Thematic Introduction): 1pm – 1:30pm
Block B (Justin Langlois): 1:30pm – 2:30pm
Block C (TBD): 3pm – 4pm

Friday, October 23, 2015
Block A (Opening Brief, TBD): 1pm – 1:30pm
Block B (TBD): 1:30pm – 2:30pm
Block C (TBD): 3pm – 4pm

Please note that enrolees need not be available for every scheduled class to attend all or part of the session. The location of this session will be announced shortly.

Enroll in this session here. Space is limited.

Session 3: Extra+Para-Curricular Activities

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Curriculum is led by the research interests of the instructors for each session’s students, with an underlying concern for the necessary maintenance of The School towards its eventual vacancy. Instructors are provided the opportunity to lead the group in any lesson, exercise, production, research, or exploratory activity they see fit as it relates to their own research or the larger interests of The School.

Extra+Para-Curricular Activities will take a cue from models of day camp, special interest clubs, and the drifting temporality that is summer-time, and explore additions and parallels whether in response to, in tension with, or with disregard for The School. Courses (or clubs) will be offered on citizenship and the public good, sugar glass, jam making, real estate interventions, and more.

In addition to participating in each Instructor’s session, students will negotiate collectively how to spend the time in their own session and can expect the full participation of the Instructors. Each session will culminate in a publication that may include, but will not be limited to, a pamphlet, exhibition, book, documentary, walk, meal, demonstration, or event, designed to offer a sense of summary or closure to the activity.

The School’s sessions operate under the following schedule, with courses offered on a rotating schedule by different instructors across each Block over the course of the month:

Monday, July 6, 2015
Block A (Thematic Introduction): 10am – 12pm
Block B (Justin Langlois): 12pm – 2pm
Block C (Open Session): 2pm – 4pm

Monday, July 20, 2015
Block A (Lexie Owen): 10am – 12pm
Block B (Joe O’Brien): 12pm – 2pm
Block C (Andrew Phillips): 2pm – 4pm

Please note that enrolees need not be available for every scheduled class to attend all or part of the session. Courses will be held at Lexie Owen’s Burrard View Marina Field House located at 545 North Slocan St, Vancouver, BC.

Enroll in this session here. Space is limited.

Session 2: Counter-Attacks: Research and Rehearsal for Eventual Institutions

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Curriculum is led by the research interests of the instructors for each session’s students, with an underlying concern for the necessary maintenance of The School towards its eventual vacancy. Instructors are provided the opportunity to lead the group in any lesson, exercise, production, research, or exploratory activity they see fit as it relates to their own research or the larger interests of The School.

Counter-Attacks: Research and Rehearsal for Eventual Institutions will be the guiding thematic our second session and will feature a wide range of rotating Instructors. Over the month of June 2015, we will assume that existing educational models and practices are an attack on the ways in which we want to live and learn, together. We will explore the means of institutional practice, their limits, and their eventual outcomes through texts, discussions, counter-proposals, and public projects.

In addition to participating in each Instructor’s session, students will negotiate collectively how to spend the time in their own session and can expect the full participation of the Instructors. Each session will culminate in a publication that may include, but will not be limited to, a pamphlet, exhibition, book, documentary, walk, meal, demonstration, or event, designed to offer a sense of summary or closure to the activity.

The School’s sessions operate under the following schedule, with courses offered on a rotating schedule by different instructors across each Block over the course of the month:

Mondays + Wednesdays 
Block A: 10am – 12pm
Block B: 12pm – 2pm

Please note that enrolees need not be available for every scheduled class to attend all or part of the session.

Enroll in this session here. Space is limited.